Monday, December 17, 2012

Rampage: The Social Roots of School Shootings




What is your school doing to get men reading with boys?  We have to find more ways to connect with boys in their early school years and stay connected with them until they are well-established literate men.

Educators, please read this book: "Rampage: The Social Roots of School Shootings" (Basic Books, 2004).  It is by Katherine S. Newman.  She is the James B. Knapp Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences at Johns Hopkins University.  Click here for Rampage.

Below are key take aways from an excellent article published on CNN:
  • Bucolic country towns are locus for most school shootings in U.S.
  • She says her research shows patterns in such shootings; they are often planned far in advance
  • She says attackers often hint at plans; they long to fit in, gain peers' attention acceptance
  • We must provide settings for children to confide in adults
"One reason shooters tip their hands is that they are trying to solve a problem. Though they are often intelligent, high-performing boys, their peers tend to see them as unattractive losers, weak and unmanly. In a school culture that values sports prowess over academic accomplishment, they face rejection. The shooters are rarely loners, but tend instead to be failed joiners, and their daily social experience is full of friction. Since they are almost always mentally or emotionally ill, those rejections -- so common in adolescence -- take on greater importance and become a fixation. Rebuffed after trying to join friendship groups, they look for ways to gain attention, to reverse their damaged."

For the full article, click here.

What is your school doing to get men reading with boys?

1 comment:

Kate said...

goodness, as far as I know nothing. I never even thought about this before--that those loners/awkward boys would need a role model or someone to confide in. I am afraid that this is the beginning of a widespread fear of awkward white males who are potentially armed with dangerous weapons.